My actor-friend Dennis Baker just posted a quote by Michael Rohd, the artistic director of the Sojourn Theatre Summer Institute. Rohd’s words caught my attention so I thought I’d re-post it here. Rohd said: 
“One thing that gets said a lot about theatre is that a bunch of people come into a room and they laugh and they cry together in the dark, and that builds community. But I’m starting to think that’s bullshit: People crave something that involves more than sitting and watching.”
I am not well-versed in the mechanics and philosophy of theater, but what Rohd said appeals to common-sense. 
It’s like that time when we want to have a date-night with our spouse of significant-other because we desperately need some “quality time” with the one we love. So, we head to the movies and sit in the dark, staring at unknown others (who aren’t really there either). At least we sit next to our date… unless we arrive late and the theater is crowded.
Almost immediately after reading Rohd’s words, I translated them into the world of worship. 
Isn’t it also true that: “One thing that gets said a lot about [worship today] is that a bunch of people come into a room and they laugh and they cry together in the dark, and that builds community. But I’m starting to think that’s bullshit: People crave something that involves more than sitting and watching.”

How do we break the cycle? The traditional theater venue was incorporated into worship early in the last century. It has become so prevalent that we don’t think twice about the absurdity of gathering for “community time” only to then sit side-by-side watching a chosen few perform for us in some way. If you are a worship leader or pastor, how are you actively working to break the cycle of “theatrical worship”?


Posted via email from worshipartist

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